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https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/achilefu-inducted-into-aimbe-college-of-fellows.aspx1037Achilefu inducted into AIMBE College of Fellows<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/achilefu-samuel-portrait.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Samuel Achilefu, an affiliated faculty member with the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Michel M. Ter-Pogossian Professor of Radiology in the School of Medicine, has been inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering’s (AIMBE) College of Fellows. He joins 156 colleagues who make up the class of 2019.<div><br/></div><div>“Being elected into the College of Fellows by my peers is an incredible honor for me in particular, as well as my trainees, colleagues <g class="gr_ gr_14 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="14" data-gr-id="14">and</g> collaborators over the years,” Achilefu said. “I am humbled to be part of this select group of achievers.”</div><div><br/></div><div>Achilefu was nominated, reviewed and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for his “outstanding contributions to near-infrared molecular imaging and image-guided surgical resection of cancer and for innovative technologies in biomedical engineering.” He was inducted at a ceremony March 25 during the organization’s annual meeting in Washington, DC.</div><div><br/></div><div>More than 2,000 members have been inducted into AIMBE’s College of Fellows, and membership is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to medical and biological engineers. Fellows are honored for making outstanding contributions to "engineering and medicine research, practice or education."<p>​</p></div>Danielle Lacey2019-03-25T05:00:00ZSamuel Achilefu, an affiliated faculty member with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, was one of only 156 fellows who made up the class of 2019.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/bme-phd-students-named-to-board-of-balsa-group.aspx1035BME PhD students named to board of BALSA Group <img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/balsa-group-logo.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Three students from the McKelvey School of Engineering were elected to the leadership board of the BALSA group at Washington University in St. Louis. Kyaw Thu Minn, Megan Cohan <g class="gr_ gr_8 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="8" data-gr-id="8" style="color: #222222; font-size: 16px;"><g class="gr_ gr_8 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="8" data-gr-id="8"><g class="gr_ gr_8 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="8" data-gr-id="8">and</g></g></g> Taylor Comte, doctoral students within the Department of Biomedical Engineering, will serve a one-year term with the nonprofit organization, which aims to provide consulting services such as market research, technology assessment and business plan development. </p><p>Minn, who has served with the organization for more than two years, has been named <g class="gr_ gr_9 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="9" data-gr-id="9"><g class="gr_ gr_9 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="9" data-gr-id="9">president</g></g> of the board and is responsible for ensuring the growth of BALSA group. Cohan has been named <g class="gr_ gr_10 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="10" data-gr-id="10"><g class="gr_ gr_10 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="10" data-gr-id="10">director</g></g> of human resources and will oversee staffing for the group, which includes reviewing prospective consultant hires. And Comte has been named <g class="gr_ gr_11 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="11" data-gr-id="11"><g class="gr_ gr_11 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="11" data-gr-id="11">director</g></g> of operations for the group and will manage records and data, as well as the group's bylaws.<br/></p>Danielle Lacey2019-03-18T05:00:00ZKyaw Thu Minn, Megan Cohan and Taylor Comte will serve on the leadership board of the nonprofit organization.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Engineering-treatments-for-the-opioid-epidemic.aspx1031Engineering treatments for the opioid epidemic<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/iStock-938938858.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>The U.S. is reeling from a public health crisis driven by the misuse of prescription and illicit opioids with nearly 12 million people abusing the drugs annually. The Midwest saw opioid overdoses increase 70 percent from July 2016 to September 2017, and every 15 minutes a baby is born suffering from opioid withdrawal as a result of maternal opioid abuse.</p><p>A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a therapeutic option that would prevent the opiates from crossing the blood-brain barrier, preventing the high abusers seek.</p><p>Jai Rudra, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the McKelvey School of Engineering, is developing <g class="gr_ gr_33 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="33" data-gr-id="33">nanovaccines</g> to combat opioid misuse with a two-year, $373,068 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) through its Cutting-Edge Basic Science Research award program.  </p><p>"Research shows that an average of 25 percent of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, and 75 percent of all people who progressed to use heroin admitted that their first opioid was a prescription drug," said Rudra, who is the first faculty member from McKelvey Engineering to receive a grant from NIDA.</p><blockquote>"The problem is that the addiction to prescription opioids is laying the foundation for abusing illicit drugs. The unfortunate thing is that there are a couple of existing pharmacotherapies that actually are addictive themselves," he said.</blockquote><p>Psychoactive drugs have to get to the brain to be able to experience "the high," so blocking them from reaching the brain prevents the rewarding effect, said Rudra, who is collaborating on the project with the Hennepin Health Care Research Institute in Minnesota.</p><p>"We are developing a therapy that will generate an anti-opioid antibody that will arrest the drug in circulation and prevent it from getting to the brain," he said. "While this immunotherapy does not directly address the underlying neurobiological mechanism behind drug abuse, it is intended to treat a person in recovery in the event of a relapse. The patient will obtain no pleasure from taking the drug and will be further motivated to continue toward recovery."</p><p>Rudra, whose research is in <g class="gr_ gr_32 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="32" data-gr-id="32">immunoengineering</g>, is using drug analogs of oxycodone and heroin called haptens that generate a selective response toward the drugs.</p><p>"Since the immune system does not see the small drug molecules as a threat, we attach them to a synthetic supramolecular nanocarrier," he said. "The carrier-drug combination is sensed by the immune system as a foreign entity, generating an anti-drug antibody response."</p><p>In addition, this treatment would not <g class="gr_ gr_31 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace" id="31" data-gr-id="31">cross react</g> with existing pharmacotherapies, such as naloxone, also known as Narcan, and could be potentially used in combination. Initially, Rudra and his team will develop a therapy for oxycodone and heroin separately, then try to develop a dual treatment that will neutralize both drugs.</p><p>"The fact that the National Institute on Drug Abuse is investing in this program shows that they are looking for alternatives to existing therapies, which attests to the magnitude of the opioid crisis today," Rudra said.</p><p>Further, Rudra said he hopes that the award and research outcomes will lead to tracking laws and creation of a database in the state of Missouri, the only state that does not monitor prescription drugs.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p><p><br/></p><br/> <div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Jai Rudra<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"><strong><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jai%20Rudra%202018.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong> </div> <li>Research: Development of nano-scale biomaterials such as nanofibers, nanoparticles, virus-like particles, and hydrogels for engaging the immune system to induce protective antibody and cell-mediated immune responses against diseases such as tuberculosis, melanoma and flavivirus infections (West Nile and Zika). </li><li>He is also investigating the development of vaccines against drugs of addiction such as cocaine.<br/></li><div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Jai-Rudra.aspx">>> View Bio</a> </div><p></p></div></div> <br/> <br/>The Midwest saw opioid overdoses increase 70 percent from July 2016 to September 2017.Beth Miller 2019-03-14T05:00:00ZBiomedical engineer Jai Rudra is developing a therapeutic option that would prevent opiates from crossing the blood-brain barrier, preventing the high abusers seek.<p>Rudra receives award from National Institute on Drug Abuse<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/pappu-awarded-mercator-fellowship-from-dfg.aspx1025Pappu awarded Mercator Fellowship from DFG <img alt="Rohit Pappu" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Pappu_Rohit_1_16_05.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Rohit Pappu, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering, has been named a recipient of the prestigious Mercator Fellowship from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). The DFG is the leading independent research funding organization in Germany, with members from more than 100 universities and research institutions.</p><div>Pappu, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, will serve as an international consultant on a collaborative project with four other institutions to investigate the internal molecular structure of the RNA-binding protein FUS and related proteins tied to the onset and progression of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The fellowship will fund travel to Mainz, Dresden and Düsseldorf for three years to foster the joint investigation.<br/></div>Rohit PappuDanielle Lacey2019-03-11T05:00:00ZRohit Pappu will join researchers from three other German institutions to study proteins tied to the onset and progression of Lou Gehrig’s disease<p>​Rohit Pappu will join researchers from three other German institutions to study proteins tied to the onset and progression of Lou Gehrig’s disease<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/silva-earns-national-mentoring-award-from-ors.aspx1032Silva earns national mentoring award from ORS<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Matt%20Silva_primary.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Matthew Silva was recently awarded the Outstanding Achievement in Mentoring Award by the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS). Silva is the Julia and Walter R. Peterson Orthopaedic Research Professor at the School of Medicine and an affiliate faculty member with the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering.  </p><p>The award honored Silva's <span style="color: #000000; font-family: "open sans", serif, emojifont; font-size: 15.3333px;">excellence in promoting the scientific and professional development, as well as the advancement to independent research careers, of new investigators. He </span>has mentored more than 50 undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in his lab, five of whom have gone on to faculty positions and independent research programs.  </p>ORS aims to promote, support, develop and encourage research in surgery and musculoskeletal disease and related disciplines. The Outstanding Achievement in Mentoring Award was created by the organization in 2014 and recognizes any member who has shown exceptional achievement in mentorship and advocacy on behalf of new investigators.  <br/>Matthew SilvaDanielle Lacey2019-03-11T05:00:00ZMatthew Silva, an affiliate faculty member with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, was recognized for his work mentoring new investigators.

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