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https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-faculty-join-WashU-Biomedical-Engineering.aspx676New faculty join WashU Biomedical Engineering<p><a href="/news/Pages/Eleven-new-faculty-to-join-School-of-Engineering-Applied-Science.aspx">Eleven new faculty will join the School of Engineering & Applied Science in the next year</a>, bringing the total number to 94. The Department of Biomedical Engineering will welcome Nathaniel Huebsch and Michael Vahey.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Whitaker_1229x431px.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p><strong>Nathaniel Huebsch, assistant professor<br/></strong></p><ul><li>PhD, engineering science and medical engineering, Harvard University<br/></li><li>BS, bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley<br/></li></ul><p>Huebsch joins BME from the University of California, Berkeley, where he has been a senior scientist in the Department of Bioengineering. Previously, he was a research scientist and postdoctoral fellow at the Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease. He will begin in January 2018.<br/></p><p style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman";"></p><p>Huebsch’s research focus is in basic and translational stem cell mechanobiology, with specific focus on hydrogels to control cell-mediated tissue repair, and 3-D models heart-on-a-chip models derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.<br/><br/></p><p style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman";"></p><p><strong>Michael Vahey, assistant professor</strong><br/></p><ul><li>PhD, SM, electrical engineering and computer science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology<br/></li><li>BS, electrical and computer engineering, Carnegie Mellon University<br/></li></ul><p></p><p>Vahey joins BME from the University of California, Berkeley, where he has been a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Bioengineering. He has received numerous awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards at the Scientific Interface grant. He will begin in March 2018.</p><p style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman";"></p><p>Vahey’s research has been in live imaging of the influenza A virus assembly; in vitro reconstitution of membrane budding by influenza virus proteins; microfluidic technologies for membrane reconstitution; and miotic spindle assembly in confined volumes.<br/></p><p>​<br/><br/></p><div><div class="cstm-section" style="font-size: 16px;"><h3>BME at WashU<br/></h3><div><strong></strong></div><p style="text-align: center;">Diagnosing and treating complex diseases are among the world's most significant long-term challenges. Biomedical engineers at WashU work with world-renowned physicians and scientists to improve global quality of life.<br/></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://bme.wustl.edu/Pages/default.aspx">>> bme.wustl.edu</a><br/></p></div></div>2017-07-05T05:00:00ZNathaniel Huebsch and Michael Vahey join the School of Engineering & Applied Science in 2018.

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